Diving post Bleomycin treatment

2 years 6 months ago #301626 by MGH
MGH created the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment
Hi,
Do any dive doctors, have any information on diving post cancer treatment with Bleomycin?
I haven't really been able to get a definitive answer from any of my doctors.

Can i still dive, or am I done?

Regards,
MGH

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
2 years 6 months ago - 2 years 6 months ago #301627 by AB
AB replied the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment
I don't know about your particular case, but I've known a couple of divers who couldn't get a straight answer from their doctor post major illness. Speaking generally, doctors are not keen to ok activities such as diving in case they could be held liable for anything which happens. You might need to ask the right questions, such as do any medications you are currently taking react badly with pressure. One diver I know is still on Warfarin which elevates his risk of a small internal bleed turning into a potentially fatal bleed. His doctor refused to clear him for diving but did say that the final decision was his, after weighing up all the risks.

Bleomycin does present ongoing risks with scuba diving. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleomycin

Consider those you dive with as any increased risk you may be willing to take affects them also, so they should be advised and consent. Expect some commercial operators to refuse you.

Alan
Last Edit: 2 years 6 months ago by AB.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
2 years 6 months ago - 2 years 6 months ago #301629 by The Padi Police
The Padi Police replied the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment
I doubt you'll get a useful answer online, maybe see one of these doctors.

www.spums.org.au/diving-doctors
Last Edit: 2 years 6 months ago by The Padi Police.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
2 years 6 months ago #301630 by Andy Del
Andy Del replied the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment
Having been in similar boats, it may be better to ask non specific questions of your oncologist and other associated specialists. Things like how long the drug has effects on your system, the intensity of the treatment you have been proscribed, are any of the other drug you may have been proscribed have a complimentary effect, etc.

It is a complex area of medicine and almost impossible for the layman to fully know what is what. Some of the questions about my treatment got me answers which were quite astounding. I feel lucky that the after effects on my diving are manageable.

cheers

Andy

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
2 years 6 months ago #301634 by MGH
MGH replied the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment
Thanks for your reply's,
I do know that I have to avoid 100% oxygen unless absolute life threatening, due to the Bleomycin have a solidifying effect on my lungs.
I was told by a GP that the oxygen levels from the compressed air increase at different atmospheres, any further info on this?

Thanks

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
2 years 6 months ago #301635 by AB
AB replied the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment
MGH,
If you are even considering diving you should have a solid knowledge of O2 and depth effects. I would not try to explain it here, but if you google O2 and depth you will get lots of information. I think it would be worth you asking an scuba instructor to go through this with you as this information is critical to you in determining the depths which will expose you to danger.

Alan

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
2 years 6 months ago - 2 years 6 months ago #301636 by The Padi Police
The Padi Police replied the topic: Diving post Bleomycin treatment

AB wrote: MGH,
If you are even considering diving you should have a solid knowledge of O2 and depth effects.

Alan


Incorrect Alan, you learn a little bit of that stuff in the course but they don't teach proper PPO2 theory until Nitrox.

To put it simply at 10 metres you're breathing twice the O2 molecules as you would at the surface. At 20 metres its three times that on the surface, at 30 metres four times and so on. At 40 metres you're breathing the equivalent quantity of O2 molecules as you would if you were breathing 100% O2 on the surface.
Last Edit: 2 years 6 months ago by The Padi Police.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
  • Not Allowed: to create new topic.
  • Not Allowed: to reply.
  • Not Allowed: to add attachements.
  • Not Allowed: to edit your message.